Things I Wish I’d Known Before Camping in the Sahara: Sandstorms & Sunrises

After two long days of travelling across Morocco from Marrakech, we arrived on the edge of the Sahara Desert.  A night camping between the dunes was the main reason for my trip!  My heart sank a little, for the first time since arriving in the country, the clouds started rolling in.  I had envisioned riding through the desert on the back on my camel, taking photos of its shadow on the sand and suddenly this all seemed to be crashing down around me.  I’d even read about tours that had to be cancelled due to bad weather.  I really didn’t want this to happen to me.

It held off long enough for us to meet our camels and head off on the hour long journey to the Bedouin tent camp, our accommodation for the night.  I hadn’t been on a camel before and had only been on a horse twice in my life (and I hated it both times!), but was surprised at how safe I felt on top of the camel.  They plodded over the sand and made light work of the ups and downs of the dunes!  I even felt brave enough to let go, essentially being hands free, so I could use my camera to be able to get as much photographic evidence of this once in a lifetime experience.  The sun even poked out long enough for me to get my shadow picture.

Camping in the Sahara Desert

It was a good job I had a new found camel riding confidence, as we neared the camp, the Berber guide in control of the camel train behind mine, thrusted me the reigns, suddenly I was ‘walking’ a line of 8 camels, while he ran off ahead, argh!

As much as I was wanting the riding section to be over, I was dreading it too!  I admit, I may have let out a little scream when the camel finally sat down onto its front legs so I could slide off its back and be reunited with the solid ground!

The wind started to pick up as the group were assigned a tent for the night.  With child like wonder, everyone literally threw their backpacks into the doorway and headed straight for the nearest dune.  It was tough.  Scaling up sand is hard at the best of times, but when it’s head on into a sand storm, there was an added joy of a face full of sand that felt like hundreds of tiny little pin pricks poking your skin.  It was hard to see and hard to breathe!  Those that made it to the top were greeted with a sight that just made you feel so small, everywhere you looked was just a big sea of orange.  We couldn’t stick it for long because of the wind, so after a quick run down the side of the dune, we headed for shelter in the more sturdier ‘meal tent’.  Over a dinner of mint tea and tagine, the group bonded over discussions of life at home and what brought them to Morocco.  Only the drum party around the fire was cancelled, there was no sign of the wind laying off, it was set for the night.  It scrapped the star gazing plan too.

After trying to secure the flapping of the walls with the small amount of luggage we’d taken with us, we crawled under the blankets and attempted to get some sleep.  It was obvious there wasn’t going to be much of it.  The temperature began to drop, the wind was still howling and a big hole in the roof of our tent, meant that it just rained sand CONSTANTLY.  There was even a kitten meowing and running through the tents…no, there really was a kitten, I wasn’t going mad!

I managed to get maybe an hour of sleep, I looked at my watch, it wasn’t far from sunrise, the wind had died down, so I decided to scale the dune and sit on the top and wait for the light show.  I had the place to myself.  I was the only one awake and I’ve never experienced the feeling of peace like it.

Sahara Desert

Slowly more people began to surface and the sunrise didn’t disappoint.  The world around me became more and more orange, the angle of the sun highlighting every little dune.  There was a short time to enjoy it, before getting in some breakfast, jumping back on the camels and heading back to reality and the long drive back to Marrakech.

Sahara Desert

The views on the way back to the vehicles were unreal, the lighting was perfect and the dunes were covered in patterns made by the wind.  Made you realise how much of an ever changing environment the Sahara really is.

My trip may have not gone 100% as planned (but then travel rarely does!) but I wouldn’t have changed my experience for the world, it’s given me life long memories, and hey, I got to experience a sandstorm in the Sahara!

Things I Wish I Had Known

  • I knew camels weren’t going to be the most comfortable of transport, but it was literally just a scratchy ole blanket chucked over its hump.  After nearly 3 hours sitting on it, I seriously thought I was going to need reconstructive butt surgery.
  • The sand is so fine, it gets EVERYWHERE.  It was in my underwear, it filled up my lens and battery compartment of my bridge camera, it managed to get in the WATERPROOF housing of my GoPro?!?!  It took FOREVER to get it out of my hair and I was shaking sand out of my shoes and backpack for months afterwards!
  • Sleeping in a Bedouin tent in a sandstorm, unless you have a scarf completely over your head, you will wake up with your eye sockets filled with sand.
  • There was a toilet!!!  Only a plastic camping toilet, with no real door, but I did wonder exactly how you go pee when there are no bushes to hide behind!  Problem solved!
  • Considering there was no real electric in the desert, the dinner that was prepared was actually amazing, there was plenty of it to go around too.
  • Take a head torch, I did and I swore by it!
  • Just like the electric, there is no water (I knew this obviously).  You have to carry enough with you to last until you are back in civilisation, our guide stopped at a shop on the edge of the desert and told us to stock up (However dinner and breakfast drinks are included).

Kylie Signature

Any questions? Feel free to comment below!

Things I Wish I Had Known Before Camping in the Sahara Desert

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2 thoughts on “Things I Wish I’d Known Before Camping in the Sahara: Sandstorms & Sunrises

  1. I recently did the Bedouin tent experience in Jordan, but it was TOTALLY different than your experience although staying in an unheated tent in the middle of January in 40 degree weather wasn’t ideal either. The Jordanian guide that I had complained about camping in Morocco himself. The view looks incredible in the desert though…

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